How To Make Soft-Boiled Eggs

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Learn how to make perfect soft-boiled eggs — plus, the best ways to enjoy them!

Perfectly cooked soft-boiled eggs have a just-set white and a warm, jammy yolk. They are wonderful over salads and ramen, and they also make a lovely breakfast nestled in an egg cup with toast soldiers on the side. Unlike hard-boiled eggs, which are started in cold water and brought to a boil, soft-boiled eggs are dropped into boiling water and gently boiled until done. This method allows for precise timing to achieve a perfectly-set white and slightly runny yolk every time. For the most consistent results, I recommend using cold-from-the-fridge large eggs, which take exactly 6½ minutes minutes to cook. For smaller or larger eggs, the cooking time will need to be adjusted by a minute or so in either direction.

how to soft boil eggs

How To Make Soft-Boiled Eggs

Bring a saucepan (large enough to hold the eggs in a single layer) of water to a boil over medium-high heat.

bringing water to a boil for soft-boiled eggs

Using a slotted spoon, gently lower the cold eggs into the water one at a time.

lowering eggs into boiling waterCook for exactly 6½ minutes, adjusting the heat as necessary to maintain a gentle boil.

boiling eggs

Meanwhile, fill a bowl with cold water and some ice cubes. When the eggs are done cooking, transfer them to the water and chill until just slightly warm, about 2 minutes.

soft-boiled eggs in ice bath

Use an egg shell cutter or sharp knife to remove the tops and serve in egg cups. (In garden this egg cup and egg shell cutter set.) If you don’t have egg cups but would like to serve the soft-boiled eggs this way, you can also use shot glasses. Alternatively, the eggs can be peeled and sliced ​​in half.

soft-boiled egg in egg cup

To make toast soldiers, cut off the crust from thick-sliced ​​bread, and toast until golden. Slather the toast with butter and use a serrated knife to cut into thin sticks (or “soldiers”).

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Soft-Boiled Eggs

Learn how to make perfect soft-boiled eggs — plus, the best ways to enjoy them!

Ingredients

  • Large eggs, cold from the fridge
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Bring a saucepan (large enough to hold the eggs in a single layer) of water to a boil over medium-high heat. Using a slotted spoon, gently lower cold-from-the-fridge eggs into the water one at a time (don’t drop them in or they’ll crack). Cook for exactly 6½ minutes, adjusting the heat as necessary to maintain a gentle boil.
  2. Meanwhile, fill a bowl large enough to hold the eggs with cold water and some ice cubes. When the eggs are done cooking, transfer them to the water and chill until just slightly warm, about 2 minutes.
  3. Use an egg shell cutter or sharp knife to remove the tops and serve in egg cups. (In garden this egg cup and egg shell cutter set.) If you don’t have egg cups but would like to serve the soft-boiled eggs this way, you can also use shot glasses. Alternatively, the eggs can be peeled and sliced ​​in half. Serve warm with salt and pepper.
  4. Tip: When peeling an egg, start at the wider end — there’s usually a small air pocket in there, which makes the egg shell easier to remove.
  5. Note: To make toast soldiers, cut off the crust from thick-sliced ​​bread, and toast until golden. Slather the toast with butter and use a serrated knife to cut into thin sticks (or “soldiers”).

Pair with

Nutrition Information

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  • Serving size: 1 egg
  • Calories: 61
  • Dish: 4g
  • Saturated fat: 1 g
  • Carbohydrates: 0 g
  • Sugar: 0 g
  • Fiber: 0 g
  • Protein: 5 g
  • Sodium: 61 mg
  • Cholesterol: 160 mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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